Tuesday, July 1, 2008

The Jewish Wedding Video

I found this lovely video of a Jewish wedding on YouTube and thought I'd share it with all of you who have been curious about what a traditional Jewish wedding actually looks like. Have fun!

23 comments:

deb said...

I have a lot of questions about your lovely video.

What did the women throw on the floor?

Why is the bride's face covered?

What does the people circling the groom signify?

Whoa, what a giant challah! Not a question, just a comment. LOL

My daughter was impressed by the man juggling fire.

USAincognito said...

Thanks for sharing this with us. Very interesting...I had no idea y'all were not allowed to dance together.

PhDCow said...

That was beautiful! So much tradition and symbolism. Thanks for sharing!

- Angela

Louie said...

Anna, that was really fascinating, and there are a million questions I would like to ask about it! It certainly looks a very lively occasion and makes my own long-ago very small-scale civil wedding seem very sedate by comparison. Did you have fire-juggling at your wedding? I've never seen anything like that! Many thanks for showing us this.

elena rulli said...

That was fun!
I like especially the contrast between prayer moments and the dancing!
Another very interesting thing was the complexity - at least to me, a non Jewish - of the many rituals that especially men went through; was there a Rabbi to guide them or were there only eleder men?
Thanks for the video, it was a learning experience
Elena

Bethany Hudson said...

Thanks, Anna! What fun. Our college Hillel used to do a "mock" Jewish wedding for the campus. Basically, two students would stand in as the bride and groom and they would walk through and explain the various traditions involved in the wedding ceremony (without actually taking vows, of course!) to teach Gentile students about the rich heritage of it.
Thanks for stopping by my family webpage. I also wrote a post on canning strawberry jam on my personal page, which I thought you might enjoy since you were writing about canning the other day: http://applecidermama.blogspot.com/2008/06/strawberry-jam-family-tradition.html
Blessings,
Bethany

Neuropoet said...

Wow Anna! Thank you so much for sharing this - there was no mistaking the joy everyone there was feeling. I'll probably watch it a few more times so I can catch more details. At the end I thought I saw people praying over a cup - were they special blessing prayers for the couple?


Peace,
~Jenny

Anonymous said...

that was so much fun! did anyone juggle flaming torches at yours? i loved the dresses, too. if only more women would realize how much more elegant they look when they don't have to tug up the top of their strapless dresses every two minutes.
love,
magda

Meghann said...

How fun! Made me think of how the Jews have always seemed to know how to celebrate since the ancient times! (King David dancing in the streets, Joshua sending the singers in front at Jericho, etc.) Thanks for sharing!

Meghann :)

Anonymous said...

How fun! Thanks for sharing this.

Susan

Jeannine said...

Thank you for sharing, Anna! This peek into a Jewish wedding was fun.

Lady-in-the-Making said...

HOW BEAUTIFUL, ANNA! This brought tears to my eyes!!!

I was touched how both the men honor the groom and the women honor the bride. Just beautiful.

God bless Israel!

Anonymous said...

That was a hoot! What a fun, lively celebration! I would have been scared to death to be on top of that table. Now you will have to explain the symbolism of everything we saw.

Ruthie

Mia said...

Great video!
That was really neat to see the different traditions--Thanks for sharing :)

Mrs. Rabe said...

That was so interesting! Thank you for sharing it.

Anonymous said...

I'm a longtime reader and a first time commenter :D

I was wondering at what point (I mean specifically) does a married Jewish woman cover her head. I do understand not all women do it, but is it during the reception, the ceremony, after everything, or what?

Thanks, Anna :)

Yours,

Sarah

Bonnie S said...

Wow, they certainly do some wild things at Jewish weddings!! What is with carrying the bride and groom around on tables, and shakeing them about, etc??! And throwing...tissues??? at each other?! Looks like fun!

Thanks for sharing the video :-)

lady jane said...

Absolute joy!

:o)

AHighandNobleCalling said...

That was the biggest challah I have ever seen!

Thanks for sharing this. We were able to participate in a Jewish wedding a couple of years ago. It was very touching!

Mrs. Anna T said...

I'm sorry it took me a couple of days to answer your questions!

Deb:

Traditionally, mothers of the bride and groom throw a plate on the floor together.

The bride's face is covered as a sign of modesty and chastity, like Rebecca covered her face when she met Isaac.

The people circling the groom, I'm not so sure. I think it's an Ashkenazi tradition.

Louie: Fire juggling is *not* an obligatory part of a Jewish wedding. :-)

Elena: A Rabbi always guides the ceremony.

Jenny: the blessings said over a cup are the "sheva brachot", seven blessings recited under the chuppah, at the end of the wedding feast, and after every "public" meal for a week after the wedding.

Sarah: the married woman covers her hair after her first night with her new husband.

Kate said...

Oh, Anna!

Just too much fun!!!

Love,

Kate

Mrs. Parunak said...

What a delightful video! My husband has been a wedding photographer for a few years, and we have seen some DISGUSTING things at receptions--horrible displays of sexuality, especially in the dancing. Ultra conservative Christians have dealt with this trend by getting rid of dancing entirely, but this seems to be a rather sad solution, not to mention an unbiblical one since Psalms 149 and 150 both say to praise the Lord with dance. Your video shows a MUCH better solution: separate rooms. What fun it would be to just dance and not worry who I was tempting!

Anonymous said...

Looks like fun. I wonder if anyone ever falls off those tables! What if a woman has her period on the wedding day? Sometimes its hard to plan around those things and I remember what you said about not being able to touch when she has her period.