Monday, May 24, 2010

Nourishing Traditions, a very interesting read

I have wanted to read this book for a long time, after many positive reviews on websites and other people's blogs. Recently, a blog friend wrote to me and told me she has an extra copy she would be glad to give away. How generous - I was thrilled to hear that. Thanks, Hilde!

So, I started reading and was hooked. I'm not going to post a full book review right now because I'm only about 1\3 through, but I already see that it's a keeper. The perspective is especially fascinating for someone like me, who has a degree and training in what the book's authors label as "politically correct nutrition", so I have studied things from a different angle.

The book is many hundreds of pages thick, but I'm getting forward at light speed because it's so interesting. I look forward to posting a review when I'm done.

18 comments:

Tracy said...

I haven't read it from cover to cover, but I have read much of it, and I've also made several of the recipes and enjoyed them so far.

Kim @ the Nourishing Cook said...

Hi... I'm cooking my way through Nourishing Traditions... come join me in the fun! It's a great read, isn't it?

Kim @ the Nourishing Cook said...

oops sorry forgot to give the address of my cooking blog...

http://thenourishingcook.com

Anonymous said...

I is a great book. You can read Weston A Price's book for free on the internet. The pictures are worth a thousand words, in my opinion.

http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/price/pricetoc.html

Audrey said...

Excellent book! I am reading it (not very fast with two little ones) right now, and what I have read so far is very thought-provoking and makes a lot of sense! We had already started to change our diet in that direction, so it's nice to have a book to give ideas.

Rose said...

Anna, I'm looking forward to your review. I read NT last year and was fascinated by it, it will be very interesting to hear your thoughts on it as you studied nutrition.

Coffee Catholic said...

I love that book! I have a copy full of notes and bookmarks. My only gripe is that she tends to over-complicate otherwise simple dishes. And she calls for so many ingredients and herbs etc. that can't be found very easily ~ or grown in many climates unless you have land and a greenhouse.

Sometimes I feel that the book is written for elite folk with access to expensive specialy supermarkets ~ or their own specialty gardens. Greenhouses and such aren't cheap!

Sophia said...

Interesting that this book should come up again. In the last couple weeks I've heard about it from several different sources. My mom ended up purchasing it--AND checking it out from the library--so now we have two copies in the house. One for her, one for me. I find it very fascinating, though I'm only about halfway through so far.

nea said...

How nice! I've been thinking ordering that book, but I'll surely wait for your review first! It'll be great to hear an opinion of a person who knows about nutritional issues.

Lily said...

I own a copy of this book, as well as a few others of hers. I hope to attend one of her presentations/discussions one day because she doesn't live too far from me and has mad appearances in the past. I have enjoyed her book for years and have taken advantage of her expertise. Enjoy!!

Sharon said...

I've been wanting to read this book! I look forward to reading your review.

Ghost said...

I love this book. Which is funny, because I almost never cook any of the recipes in it. I use it more as a reference for cooking techniques and nutrition, and my regular broth-making day is a direct result of this book's influence. And I think it put me solidly on the road to better health, after my vegetarian years had crashed my hormones and metabolism. If you really like the book I also recommend Sandor Ellix Katz's book *Wild Fermentation*

DawnM said...

Using the principles in this book has contributed to a lot of physical healing in our family. Both of my kids were diagnosed with fibromyalgia when they were teenagers. They are now healed (we carefully avoid all unsoaked/unfermented grains, but my daughter also has to follow a modified specific carbohydrate diet). My husband's diabetes is actually very easy to control by diet when we follow the principles in Healing Traditions and on their website. I can't recommend it enough.

Michelle said...

A friend of mine has a home business where she puts out menu mailers where the food follows NT-style guidelines. There's a link for it on my blog

Mrs. and Mama K said...

I LOOOVE that book! There are some great recipes in it. Like the Korean Flank steak...yum!!

Angela said...

I have been looking at this book for a while and just ordered it last night. Can't wait to read it.

Anonymous said...

Hi, I just wanted to say that I love your blog, you are such a refreshing person! I, too, am reading this book, and it is definitely one to keep and read over and over again. For those of you who can't wait to get it, you can download Amazon Kindle FREE to your PC, and purchase the book instantly there, I believe it is $9.99. I have a copy on my PC, and am currently awaiting delivery of a hardcopy.

Steve & Paula said...

Because of us learning all about traditional foods, my husbands type 1 no longer causes healing issues. No more infections!
We take fermented cod liver oil, and we never have to see the dr for antibiotics.

And best of all, his neuropathy has partially reversed.
Corresponding links and books.
www.westonaprice.org
Dr Prices book, http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks02/0200251h.html
And the best real food blogger, www.cheeseslave.com