Wednesday, October 27, 2010

A crop of grapefruits

This is our grapefruit tree. Last time during its blooming season, it attracted a lot of bees, which I was very happy about. It resulted in good pollination and a much better crop than last time. The grapefruits are small but very sweet and taste so much better than store-bought fruit.
I wonder how well they will keep on the tree if we eat them a little at a time, or whether it's better to pick them all at once. We are still very novice gardeners, you see. :o)

I'm relishing the pleasure of picking fruit and eating it, still warm from the sun, right under the tree where it grew. I believe it's also good for children to see fruit growing, then finding its way to our plates. It removes some of the detachedness in having all our produce come home in plastic bags from the supermarket.

We also did some experimental planting of tomatoes and radishes this week, and if the results are successful, I'll share pictures.

11 comments:

Stam House said...

this is so cool! What a blessing to be able to grow these where you live!!!

Kate said...

I've NEVER had fresh citrus, living in Upstate New York where citrus simply doesn't grow. What a treat to have it in your own yard, and grapefruit, too! Yum!

Apples are the main tree fruit where I live. Nothing tastes better than an apple plucked off a tree and eaten right there in the crisp, coolness of Autumn.

Hearth said...

I live in Southern California - and yes, you can leave your fruit on the tree. Much the best place for it. *Eventually* it will go bad, but you should have a few months to enjoy it, better than a few weeks if you pick and put in the refrigerator!

Just keep an eye out, you want to eat what falls on its own - and it will, a bit.

PS Citrus fruit is ripe when it comes off the tree easily in your hand, with no stem attached. A slight twist is acceptable, much more means not quite ripe. Of course "not quite" with citrus is probably not super noticable. :)

Denise said...

Hi Anna, I love grapefruit! Where we live we can't grow citrus but we have apples and pears. We live in Southeastern Pennsylvania. A friend fro Texas told us the longer you leave them(grapefruit) on the tree the sweetwer they get. And Texas has fantastic grapefruit,Rio Star and Ruby Star.

momto9 said...

fresh fruit and veggies always taste better because they get a chance to actually ripen while nourished by the tree/plant...unlike storebought that's picked before the fruit/veggie is ripe.

I always enjoy seeing pictures of your yard...

Michelle said...

I'm a novice gardener myself, and I have no experience with fruit trees at all, but I wonder if they would ultimately fall off of the tree if you left them on too long.

Kelly said...

How lovely to have a grapefruit tree right in your back yard! And I can say from experience that children need to know where food really comes from. My daughter is an odd ball in that if you ask her where food comes from she says "a farm" LOL

Rose said...

Lucky you Anna! If it starts to look like it's going to get too ripe, I have a suggestion. I juice our limes and then freeze the juice in ice cube trays. It's only a few moments work to do the juicing, then freeze and then the cubes can go in plastic bags in the freezer. But I hope you can eat them all warm from the tree!

City Sister said...

I never thought of grapefruits as sweet... someone who owns an orange tree said they pick all of theirs at the same time and then wrap them in newspaper (DO NOT WASH)and in a cool dry place they'll last for months!

Anonymous said...

We have been growing ruby red grapefruit in south TX for 25 years. I find it best to keep the fruit on the trees. If we have a serious chance of frost, I remove all the fruit, peel and section, then freeze in zip-lock bags. By the way, I have been reading your blog for years. What a beautiful life and family you have!

Anonymous said...

Grapefruit is one of my favorite citrus fruits! Lucky you, to have this tree growing in your own yard!

Brenda